Most common uses of Cloud Computing

Cloud computing has been credited with increasing competitiveness through cost reduction, greater flexibility, elasticity and optimal resource utilization. Here are most common uses of cloud computing.

Private cloud & hybrid cloud
Among the many incentives for using cloud, there are two situations where organizations are looking into ways to assess some of the applications they intend to deploy into their environment through the use of a cloud. While in the case of test and development it may be limited in time, adopting a hybrid cloud approach allows for testing application workloads, therefore providing the comfort of an environment without the initial investment that might have been rendered useless should the workload testing fail.

Another use of hybrid cloud is also the ability to expand during periods of limited peak usage, which is often preferable to hosting a large infrastructure that might seldom be of use. An organization would seek to have the additional capacity and availability of an environment when needed on a pay as you go basis.

Big data analytics
One of the aspects offered by leveraging cloud computing is the ability to tap into vast quantities of both structured and unstructured data to harness the benefit of extracting business value.

Retailers and suppliers are now extracting information derived from consumers’ buying patterns to target their advertising and marketing campaigns to a particular segment of the population. Social networking platforms are now providing the basis for analytics on behavioral patterns that organizations are using to derive meaningful information.

File storage
Cloud can offer you the possibility of storing your files and accessing, storing and retrieving them from any web-enabled interface. The web services interfaces are usually simple. At any time and place you have high availability, speed, scalability and security for your environment. In this scenario, organizations are only paying for the amount of storage they are actually consuming, and do so without the worries of overseeing the daily maintenance of the storage infrastructure.

There is also the possibility to store the data either on or off premises depending on the regulatory compliance requirements. Data is stored in virtualized pools of storage hosted by a third party based on the customer specification requirements.

Infrastructure as a service (IaaS) and platform as a service (PaaS)
When it comes to IaaS, using an existing infrastructure on a pay-per-use scheme seems to be an obvious choice for companies saving on the cost of investing to acquire, manage and maintain an IT infrastructure. There are also instances where organizations turn to PaaS for the same reasons while also seeking to increase the speed of development on a ready-to-use platform to deploy applications.

Test and development
Probably the best scenario for the use of a cloud is a test and development environment. This entails securing a budget, setting up your environment through physical assets, significant manpower and time. Then comes the installation and configuration of your platform. All this can often extend the time it takes for a project to be completed and stretch your milestones.

With cloud computing, there are now readily available environments tailored for your needs at your fingertips. This often combines, but is not limited to, automated provisioning of physical and virtualized resources.

Disaster recovery
This is yet another benefit derived from using cloud based on the cost effectiveness of a disaster recovery (DR) solution that provides for a faster recovery from a mesh of different physical locations at a much lower cost that the traditional DR site with fixed assets, rigid procedures and a much higher cost.

Backup
Backing up data has always been a complex and time-consuming operation. This included maintaining a set of tapes or drives, manually collecting them and dispatching them to a backup facility with all the inherent problems that might happen in between the originating and the backup site. This way of ensuring a backup is performed is not immune to problems such as running out of backup media , and there is also time to load the backup devices for a restore operation, which takes time and is prone to malfunctions and human errors.

Cloud-based backup, while not being the panacea, is certainly a far cry from what it used to be. You can now automatically dispatch data to any location across the wire with the assurance that neither security, availability nor capacity are issues.

While the list of the above uses of cloud computing is not exhaustive, it certainly give an incentive to use the cloud when comparing to more traditional alternatives to increase IT infrastructure flexibility, as well as leverage on big data analytics and mobile computing.

5 uses of cloud computing in 2015
Hybrid: Hybrid cloud makes it possible to bridge incompatible clouds and traditional on-premises environments to operate fluidly as one. As a result, small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs) increase control and security of their data and are able to bring portability to their back and front office applications, thus improving overall productivity and freeing employees to focus on their core mission innovation instead of worrying about IT.

Infrastructure: Businesses are taking advantage of scaling computing resources on demand and avoiding extra capital expenditure for resources they may only need for a few weeks. All of this is happening while quickly scaling up when they require additional bandwidth, storage or processing power. SMBs are flocking towards infrastructures that offer the flexibility to uniquely design their computing environment the way they know it works best.

Test & Development: Open, cloud-based environments are empowering SMBs to quickly innovate, test and launch new applications and solutions, cutting deployment times from months to hours or even minutes in many cases. Even the smallest developer teams are creating business applications with ease and speed, helping them to better serve their market and compete on a global scale.

Big Data and Analytics: The cloud is empowering SMBs to take advantage of big data and analytics technology that, through traditional means, would be too costly or complex for them. Now, these small business owners can identify the data that are most meaningful to their business, analyze and act upon key insights. This means uncovering and predicting trends before they happen, fostering a deeper understanding of customers, operations and markets. This enables companies to act when and where the positive business impact is greatest.

Mobility: The spread of cloud-based mobile solutions is helping small business owners easily and affordably arm their workforce with key applications and company information on the go. Having valuable customer data or inventory information at the touch of a finger helps improve efficiency and enhances customer relationships as they grow their business. This new level of mobility also enables small entrepreneurial businesses once confined by geography to establish a global presence and improve customer engagement.